FINDING A LOST PET

An ounce of prevention!

There are a few things that all pet owners should do when they get a new pet and before any emergencies come up!

Keep a file with all of the pertinent information about your pet so you have it available. It should include:

  • • Up to date photos of your pet
  • • Microchip information with current contact information
  • • Most counties require your dog to be licensed; you will be fined without a current one. Keep it on the collar with the ID tag.
  • • Medical History, including vaccine records (remember that ALL pets should be current on shots, but a current rabies vaccine is required by law)
  • • Emergency contact if you are unavailable, including the name and phone number of your veterinarian.

Also consider:

  • • Make sure your pet ALWAYS has an ID tag that includes your name, current phone number and any relevant contact information and that the ID is on a collar and on the pet.
  • • Periodically walk your fence line and look for any new holes or breaks in the fence. Remember, a panicked animal can squeeze through a hole that looks much smaller than their body! If you have an underground fence system, always have back up batteries.

It is your responsibility to keep your animal safe and not running loose from your property. Be aware of PA Laws regarding owning a pet: PA Dept of Agriculture Dog Laws

  • • Periodically walk your fence line and look for any new holes or breaks in the fence. Remember, a panicked animal can squeeze through a hole that looks much smaller than their body! If you have a underground fence system, always have back up batteries.
  • • Make sure your pet ALWAYS has an ID tag that includes your name, current phone number and any relevant contact information and that the ID is on a collar and on the pet.

Please keep in mind, a dog should not be kept outside in the yard for long durations. It can be a very positive experience for a well-mannered dog to spend a lazy day lying out in the yard and getting fresh air, but when the yard replaces teaching your dog appropriate house manners, we would encourage you to reconsider why you have a dog in the first place. We believe dogs should live in the home and the yard should be a place for exercise, enrichment and rewards.

A dog who is kept primarily outside can experience social isolation leading to excessive barking and howling in an attempt to reunite with his “pack” (you and your family). When a family member enters the yard to spend time with him, he will start excessively jumping, barking and whining - showing a level of enthusiasm which will most likely cause the person to NOT want to visit with the dog in the future. Eventually, the dog will become exceedingly independent and difficult to train as his desire “to please” will be replaced by the driving need to occupy his own time. He will focus on automatic rewards - do what feels good in the moment! Ripping up the garden, digging large cool holes in the dirt to lay in, fence-fighting with the neighbor’s dog, chewing the deck, etc. Without a person there to redirect their focus toward positive activities, dogs will do what they find rewarding but will most likely not be what the owner desires.

Finding a lost cat

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Finding a lost dog

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